Beaufort sc school volunteer felon passed screening process island packet data recovery raw

Almond and Alice Walton, the district’s chief administrative and human resources officer, refused to speak to a reporter from The Island Packet and The Beaufort Gazette about this incident. Moss was on vacation the week of June 11 and could not be reached for comment, according to the district’s spokesperson Jim Foster.

But, in an email sent to Henrickson on May 11, Moss wrote: "(Kelley’s) approval to serve as a volunteer was based on the information received and was limited in scope … I have not found any connection from his background to his work with the JROTC program."

At the start of the 2014-2015 school year, the district began its new screening process, conducted by the Background Investigation Bureau, which was said to be more comprehensive than the previous checks by the S.C.


Law Enforcement Division.

The SLED checks covered mostly offenses committed in South Carolina and only those voluntarily reported to the statewide agency by local law enforcement. By comparison, the Background Investigation Bureau conducts nationwide checks that incorporate county, state and federal court records, an address history and name aliases.

After multiple requests from The Island Packet and The Beaufort Gazette to speak with administrators about the district’s process for screening volunteers, Foster instead responded with an email, saying that the district decides on a case-by-case basis if someone who is convicted of a nonviolent offense can serve as a school volunteer. Administrators in the district’s human resources department refused to speak to a reporter and explain how those decisions are made.

May said he paid Kelley for white gloves and T-shirts that he never received. Each cadet also was charged about $300 for the national drill team competition and were later informed by the head of the high school’s ROTC program that they would be refunded more than $100.

Foster wrote in an email that Beaufort High "reviewed the documentation for JROTC transactions and found everything to be in order." The refunds, he wrote, were due to some additional funds made available by the U.S. Air Force after the trip.

Almond would not talk to a reporter to explain how she was unaware of Kelley’s criminal history if the background check uncovered it and school district officials decided "on a case-by-case basis" that he could responsibly serve as a volunteer.

Almond and Alice Walton, the district’s chief administrative and human resources officer, refused to speak to a reporter from The Island Packet and The Beaufort Gazette about this incident. Moss was on vacation the week of June 11 and could not be reached for comment, according to the district’s spokesperson Jim Foster.

But, in an email sent to Henrickson on May 11, Moss wrote: "(Kelley’s) approval to serve as a volunteer was based on the information received and was limited in scope … I have not found any connection from his background to his work with the JROTC program."

At the start of the 2014-2015 school year, the district began its new screening process, conducted by the Background Investigation Bureau, which was said to be more comprehensive than the previous checks by the S.C. Law Enforcement Division.

The SLED checks covered mostly offenses committed in South Carolina and only those voluntarily reported to the statewide agency by local law enforcement. By comparison, the Background Investigation Bureau conducts nationwide checks that incorporate county, state and federal court records, an address history and name aliases.

After multiple requests from The Island Packet and The Beaufort Gazette to speak with administrators about the district’s process for screening volunteers, Foster instead responded with an email, saying that the district decides on a case-by-case basis if someone who is convicted of a nonviolent offense can serve as a school volunteer. Administrators in the district’s human resources department refused to speak to a reporter and explain how those decisions are made.

May said he paid Kelley for white gloves and T-shirts that he never received. Each cadet also was charged about $300 for the national drill team competition and were later informed by the head of the high school’s ROTC program that they would be refunded more than $100.

Foster wrote in an email that Beaufort High "reviewed the documentation for JROTC transactions and found everything to be in order." The refunds, he wrote, were due to some additional funds made available by the U.S. Air Force after the trip.

Almond would not talk to a reporter to explain how she was unaware of Kelley’s criminal history if the background check uncovered it and school district officials decided "on a case-by-case basis" that he could responsibly serve as a volunteer.

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