AMY WEIRICH

Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich and Memphis police director Toney Armstrong announced the decision Tuesday, Jan. 5. They say the phase-in will give them time to evaluate and make improvements in the complex system and the estimated 3,500 hours of footage the cameras could generate in just one day. The phase-ins would be a two – to four-week trial period in each Memphis Police Department precinct during 2016. Weirich said former Mayor A C Wharton’s original plan to outfit police with the body cameras and their patrol cars with dashboard cameras starting last September was “unworkable because of the technology, the logistics,


the personnel required and the additional costs involved.” Weirich also said there are “significant hurdles” in the rollout of the body cams. “It makes no sense to put 2,000 cameras on the street prematurely and then end up having to correct 2,000 mistakes,” she said in a written statement. “The bottom line is that these videos are going to be evidence, not entertainment.” The estimate of 3,500 hours of footage a day came from city special counsel Alan Crone. Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration plans to lobby the Tennessee Legislature for a “sustainable state funding stream to support electronic video data storage, recovery and production.

” “It’s a sensitive issue from a lot of different sides,” Crone told Memphis City Council members Tuesday. Weirich estimated the body cameras could produce 50,000 hours of video a year that has to be reviewed, stored and redacted. It would all be available to the public through the state’s open records law, not to mention the discovery process in lawsuits and criminal court trials. More than 100 police patrol cars have dashboard cameras, according to Armstrong, and those cameras have recorded more than 1,000 videos that already have been stored. AMY WEIRICH Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich and Memphis police director Toney Armstrong announced the decision Tuesday, Jan. 5. They say the phase-in will give them time to evaluate and make improvements in the complex system and the estimated 3,500 hours of footage the cameras could generate in just one day. The phase-ins would be a two – to four-week trial period in each Memphis Police Department precinct during 2016. Weirich said former Mayor A C Wharton’s original plan to outfit police with the body cameras and their patrol cars with dashboard cameras starting last September was “unworkable because of the technology, the logistics, the personnel required and the additional costs involved.

” Weirich also said there are “significant hurdles” in the rollout of the body cams. “It makes no sense to put 2,000 cameras on the street prematurely and then end up having to correct 2,000 mistakes,” she said in a written statement. “The bottom line is that these videos are going to be evidence, not entertainment.” The estimate of 3,500 hours of footage a day came from city special counsel Alan Crone.

Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration plans to lobby the Tennessee Legislature for a “sustainable state funding stream to support electronic video data storage, recovery and production.” “It’s a sensitive issue from a lot of different sides,” Crone told Memphis City Council members Tuesday. Weirich estimated the body cameras could produce 50,000 hours of video a year that has to be reviewed, stored and redacted. It would all be available to the public through the state’s open records law, not to mention the discovery process in lawsuits and criminal court trials. More than 100 police patrol cars have dashboard cameras, according to Armstrong, and those cameras have recorded more than 1,000 videos that already have been stored.

AMY WEIRICH Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich and Memphis police director Toney Armstrong announced the decision Tuesday, Jan. 5. They say the phase-in will give them time to evaluate and make improvements in the complex system and the estimated 3,500 hours of footage the cameras could generate in just one day. The phase-ins would be a two – to four-week trial period in each Memphis Police Department precinct during 2016. Weirich said former Mayor A C Wharton’s original plan to outfit police with the body cameras and their patrol cars with dashboard cameras starting last September was “unworkable because of the technology, the logistics, the personnel required and the additional costs involved.” Weirich also said there are “significant hurdles” in the rollout of the body cams. “It makes no sense to put 2,000 cameras on the street prematurely and then end up having to correct 2,000 mistakes,” she said in a written statement. “The bottom line is that these videos are going to be evidence, not entertainment.” The estimate of 3,500 hours of footage a day came from city special counsel Alan Crone. Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration plans to lobby the Tennessee Legislature for a “sustainable state funding stream to support electronic video data storage, recovery and production.

” “It’s a sensitive issue from a lot of different sides,” Crone told Memphis City Council members Tuesday. Weirich estimated the body cameras could produce 50,000 hours of video a year that has to be reviewed, stored and redacted.

It would all be available to the public through the state’s open records law, not to mention the discovery process in lawsuits and criminal court trials. More than 100 police patrol cars have dashboard cameras, according to Armstrong, and those cameras have recorded more than 1,000 videos that already have been stored.

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